Thought Field Therapy Trainings

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**Robson, R. H., Robson, P. M.  Ludwig, R., Mitabu C., & Phillips, C. (2016). Effectiveness of Thought Field Therapy provided by newly instructed community workers to a traumatized population in Uganda: A randomized trial. Current Research in Psychology. doi:10.3844/crpsp.201


In Uganda, therapists trained 36 community members in the use of TFT. Then, the community members provided treatment to 256 participants who demonstrated symptoms of Posttraumatic Stress. Participants were divided into treatment and control groups and were assessed with the Posttraumatic Checklist for Civilians (PCL-C). Those who were treated with TFT improved significantly one week after their treatment. While the control group improved, they improved significantly less than those in the treatment group. After treatment, they improved greatly. They showed benefits 19 months later.

**Connolly, S. M., & Sakai, C. E. (2011). Brief trauma symptom intervention with Rwandan genocide survivors using Thought Field Therapy. International Journal of Emergency Mental Health, 13(3), 161-172.


One hundred forty-five adults who had survived the genocide in Rwanda participated in a randomized waitlist control study in which they were randomly assigned to a treatment group and a waitlist control group (Connolly & Sakai, 2011). Results were statistically significant (p < .001) for 9 or the 10 TSI trauma subscales and for frequency and severity of the MPSS. Effect sizes were moderate to large. Those who received TFT had reduced trauma symptoms, which were maintained two years later.  

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Sakai, C., Connolly, S., & Oas, P. (2010). Treatment of PTSD in Rwanda genocide survivors Using Thought Field Therapy. International Journal of Emergency Mental Health, 12(1), 41-49.


Sakai, Connolly, and Oas (2010) provided a session in TFT for 50 adolescents who had been orphaned in the Rwandan genocide. The session took place 12 years after the genocide. Their scores on a PTSD checklist that they had filled out and that their caregivers had filled out decreased significantly from pretest to posttest (p < .001). Interviews also indicated significant reduction in symptoms, including bedwetting, nightmares, depression, aggression, and other symptoms. The adolescents began using TFT as part of the culture in the orphanage, and the results on both checklists were maintained a year later. 

**Denotes random controlled trial 

Research

Schöninger, B. (2004). Efficacy of Thought Field Therapy (TFT) as a treatment modality for persons with public speaking anxiety (Doctoral dissertation). Retrieved from ProQuest Dissertations and Theses Global. (UMI No. 3149748)   


Thought Field Therapy® significantly decreased fear of speaking in public as measured by the Subjective Units of Distress (1-10) self-report scale and the Speaker Anxiety Scale (Schöninger, 2004). 

Blaich, R. (1988). Applied kinesiology and human performance. Selected papers of the International College of Applied Kinesiology, (Winter), 1-15.
​Blaich (1988) found that readers improved in their reading speed by 45% after using Dr. Callahan’s treatment of tapping the side of the hand for Psychological Reversal. 

**Irgens, A., Dammen, T., Nysaeter T., & Hoffart, A. (2012). Thought Field Therapy (TF) as a treatment for anxiety symptoms: A randomized controlled trial. Explore, 8(6) 331-337.


Irgens, Dammen, Nysæter, and Hoffart (2012) used TFT to treat 45 participants who had an anxiety disorder. One group received treatment immediately, and the other group received treatment 2 ½ months later. Participants who were treated with TFT improved significantly on two anxiety instruments and one function instrument. Three months later and 12 months later, they had maintained the effects of the treatment.

**Connolly, S. M., Roe-Sepowitz, D., Sakai, C. E., & Edwards, J. (2013). Utilizing community resources to treat PTSD: A randomized controlled study using Thought Field Therapy. African Journal of Traumatic Stress, 3(1), 24-32.


In this randomized controlled study, Connolly, Roe-Sepowitz, Sakai, and Edwards (2013) provided Rwandan community leaders with training in Thought Field Therapy. Then, they provided one treatment to 164 survivors of the genocide. The participants took the Trauma Symptom Inventory (TSI) and the Modified Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Symptom Scale (MPSS). Severity and frequency of traumatic symptoms were significantly reduced in the treatment group and then in the waitlist control group. 

Edwards J. (2016). Healing in Rwanda: The words of the therapists. The International Journal of Healing and Caring, 16(1). Retrieved from http://ijhc.org/2015/12/ijhc-master-table-of-contents-full/


Edwards (2016) analyzed interviews with 35 Rwandan community members who had been trained in Thought Field Therapy and had used it for the past year. The therapists talked about the changes that their clients had made as a result of TFT. The therapists indicated that TFT had impacted the community and was an effective treatment for trauma. They suggested that TFT be used widely in Rwanda.

Edwards, J. L., & Vanchu-Orosco, M. (2017). A meta-analysis of randomized and non-randomized trials of Thought Field Therapy (TFT) for the treatment of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD): PRELIMINARY RESULTS. Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the Association for Comprehensive Energy Psychology, San Antonio, Texas.


Edwards and Vanchu-Orosco (2017) conducted a preliminary meta-analysis of studies in which therapists had used Thought Field Therapy to treat trauma. Five studies met the criteria for inclusion. “The overall effect size for the pre- to post-TFT treatment in quasi-experimental conditions (-2.47) was large and statistically significant. The results show that TFT is highly effective in reducing trauma symptoms in a variety of populations and settings” (p. 1).  

Sakai, C., Paperny, D., Mathews, M., Tanida, G., Boyd, G., Simons, A., Yamamoto, C., Mau, C., & Nutter, L. (2001). Thought Field Therapy clinical applications: Utilization in an HMO in behavioral medicine and behavioral health services. Journal of Clinical Psychology, 57(10), 1215-1227.*


In 714 participants who were treated by 7 therapists for 1,594 problems, paired-samples t-tests indicated significant reduction on the Subjective Units of Distress (1-10) self-report scale in 31 categories of distress from pretest to posttest (Sakai et al., 2001).* 

Vancey, V. (2002). The use of Thought Field Therapy in educational settings (Doctoral dissertation). Retrieved from ProQuest Dissertations and Theses Global. (UMI No. 3059661) 


Yancey (2002) found that middle school students used Thought Field Therapy® to eliminate angry and violent feelings, to achieve at higher levels in school, and to overcome difficulties in relationships with friends and family. Adults used TFT with students to assist them in improving their scores on tests, relieve stress, get along better with family members and friends, overcome violent feelings, and grow in self-confidence. They also used it with themselves, their families, and their friends to overcome stress. 

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The following studies have been done on Thought
Field Therapy® (TFT):

Dunnewold, A. L. (2014). Thought Field Therapy efficacy following large scale traumatic events. Current Research in Psychology, 5(1), 34-39. doi:10.38/crpsp.2014


Dunnewold (2014) provided a review of the literature of studies that had been conducted on Thought Field Therapy. She concluded that, based on the findings of the studies, community leaders can treat genocide survivors effectively.

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You can either attend her Thought Field Therapy® trainings or invite her to present TFT seminars for your group.


NREPP Recognizes Thought Field Therapy as an Effective Tapping Therapy

The National Registry of Evidence-based Programs and Practices (NREPP), a searchable-online database of mental health and substance abuse interventions (a service of the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Agency (SAMHA) within the United States Department of Health and Human Services) has listed Thought Field Therapy as an effective evidence-based practice for improving personal resilience/self-concept, for improving self-regulation, and for reducing trauma-and stressor-related disorders and symptoms.


They have also listed Thought Field Therapy as promising for reducing depression and depressive symptoms; for improving general functioning and well being; for reducing phobia, panic, and generalized anxiety disorders and symptoms; and for reducing unspecified and other mental health disorders and symptoms.
Go to NREPP – US Dept of Health to see the full report.


The following studies were evaluated in this review:
Connolly, S., & Sakai, C. (2011). Brief trauma intervention with Rwandan genocide-survivors using Thought Field Therapy. International Journal of Emergency Mental Health, 13(3), 161–172.
Robson, H., Robson, P. M., Ludwig, R., Mitabu, C., & Phillips, C. (n.d.). Effectiveness of Thought Field Therapy provided by newly-instructed community workers to a traumatised population in Uganda: A randomised trial. Manuscript submitted for publication.
Irgens, A., Dammen, T., Nysaeter, T. E., & Hoffart, A. (2012). Thought Field Therapy (TFT) as a treatment for anxiety symptoms: A randomized controlled trial. Explore: The Journal of Science and Healing, 8, 331–338.
Connolly, S. M., Roe-Sepowitz, D., Sakai, C., & Edwards, J. (2013). Utilizing community resources to treat PTSD: A randomized controlled study using Thought Field Therapy. African Journal of Traumatic Stress, 3(1), 24–31.

*The Journal of Clinical Psychology articles were not peer reviewed and were published with invited critical reviews.

Darby, D. W. (2002). The efficacy of Thought Field Therapy as a treatment modality for individuals diagnosed with blood-injection-injury phobia (Doctoral dissertation). Retrieved from ProQuest Dissertations and Theses Global. (UMI No. 3085152)


Thought Field Therapy® significantly decreased phobia of needles as measured prior to the treatment and a month later using the questions on the Fear Survey Schedule (FSS) related to blood-injection-injury phobia and the Subjective Units of Distress (1-10) self-report scale (Darby, 2002). 

Folkes, C. (2002). Thought Field Therapy and trauma recovery. International Journal of Emergency Mental Health, 4(2), 99-104.


Thirty-one immigrants to the United States showed a statistically significant decrease in posttraumatic symptoms as indicated by scores on the Posttraumatic Checklist-C, as well as on their Subjective Units of Distress (1-10) self-report scale from before the Thought Field Therapy® treatment to 30 days later (Folkes, 2002). 

Johnson, C., Shala, M., Sejdijaj, X., Odell, R., & Dabishevci, D. (2001). Thought Field Therapy: Soothing the bad moments of Kosovo.  Journal of Clinical Psychology, 57(10), 1237-1240.*


Of 105 survivors in Kosovo who had 249 traumas, 103 reported complete absence of the trauma with 247 of the traumas. Presence or absence of the “bad moment” (p. 1238), or trauma, was used due to cultural taboos against the use of the Subjective Units of Distress (1-10) self-report scale. The results remained an average of five months later (Johnson, 2001).* 

To discuss your interest in Thought Field Therapy® workshops, contact Jenny Edwards, TFT-VT at info@thoughtfieldtherapytrainings.com